Fissure in ANO

An anal fissure is an anal tear, crack or ulcer in the lining of the anal canal - a cut or tear in the anus that extends into the anal canal. It is a common cause of red blood in the stool (feces) and toilet paper. According to rectal (colorectal) doctors, approximately one tenth of all their patient visits are for anal fissures. Patients commonly feel pain during and after a bowel movement.

Signs & Symptoms:

Signs and symptoms of an anal fissure include:

  • Pain, sometimes severe, during bowel movements
  • Pain after bowel movements that can last up to several hours
  • Bright red blood on the stool or toilet paper after a bowel movement
  • Itching or irritation around the anus
  • A visible crack in the skin around the anus
  • A small lump or skin tag on the skin near the anal fissure

Causes:

Common causes of anal fissure include:

  • Passing large or hard stools
  • Constipation and straining during bowel movements
  • Chronic diarrhea
  • Inflammation of the anorectal area, caused by Crohn's disease or another inflammatory bowel disease
  • Childbirth

Less common causes of anal fissures include:

  • Anal cancer
  • HIV
  • Tuberculosis
  • Syphilis
  • Herpes

Risk Factors:

Factors that may increase your risk of developing an anal fissure include:

  • Infancy. Many infants experience an anal fissure during their first year of life; experts aren't sure why.
  • Aging. Older adults may develop an anal fissure partly due to slowed circulation, resulting in decreased blood flow to the rectal area.
  • Constipation. Straining during bowel movements and passing hard stools increase the risk of tearing.
  • Childbirth. Anal fissures are more common in women after they give birth.
  • Crohn's disease. This inflammatory bowel disease causes chronic inflammation of the intestinal tract, which may make the lining of the anal canal more vulnerable to tearing.

Complications:

Complications of anal fissure can include:

  • Failure to heal. An anal fissure that fails to heal within six weeks is considered chronic and may need further treatment.
  • Recurrence. Once you've experienced an anal fissure, you are prone to having another one.
  • A tear that extends to surrounding muscles. An anal fissure may extend into the ring of muscle that holds your anus closed (internal anal sphincter), making it more difficult for your anal fissure to heal. An unhealed fissure can trigger a cycle of discomfort that may require medications or surgery to reduce the pain and to repair or remove the fissure.

Homoeopathy helps in healing and curing anal fissures, relieve chronic constipation, improve anal muscle tone as well as helps in preventing relapses.

Self Help For Fissure

  • Diet - As constipation is the main culprit behind fissure-in-ano, all steps to avoid constipation will help to a great extent. A high-fiber diet and extra fluids to prevent constipation are recommended. This means eating more fruits, vegetables, cereals, whole meal bread, etc. and drinking at least 8 glasses (12 cups) of water a day. Reduced intake of coffee and alcohol also helps.
  • To relieve pain - Apply a warm towel to the area. Warm baths or Sitz baths also relieve pain. Use 8 inches of warm water in the bathtub, 2 or 3 times a day for 5-10 minutes. Do not expose the anal skin to hot bath water or hot shower water. Use only luke-warm water on this area.
  • Physical activity - No restrictions are necessary. In fact, physical activity reduces the likelihood of constipation.
  • To prevent infection - Gently clean the anal area with soap and water after each bowel movement. Do not put any creams or ointments, cornstarch, talcum or other powder, witch hazel, or anything else on or into the anus.
  • To prevent recurrence- 1. Avoid constipation by drinking at least 8 glasses of water daily and eating a diet high in fiber. 2. Develop regular bowel habit. Do not suppress desire of passing stools as this results in hard and large stools, which usually produces injury to the anus. 3. Avoid straining at stools.
 
 

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