Urinary Tract Infection(UTI)

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection in any part of your urinary system - your kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. Most infections involve the lower urinary tract - the bladder and the urethra. Women are at greater risk of developing a UTI than men are. Infection limited to your bladder can be painful and annoying. However, serious consequences can occur if a UTI spreads to your kidneys.

Causes:

Urinary tract infections typically occur when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. Although the urinary system is designed to keep out such microscopic invaders, these defenses sometimes fail. When that happens, bacteria may take hold and grow into a full-blown infection in the urinary tract. The most common UTIs occur mainly in women and affect the bladder and urethra.

  • Infection of the bladder (cystitis). This type of UTI is usually caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli), a type of bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Sexual intercourse may lead to cystitis, but you don't have to be sexually active to develop it. All women are at risk of cystitis because of their anatomy - specifically, the short distance from the urethra to the anus and the urethral opening to the bladder.
  • Infection of the urethra (urethritis). This type of UTI can occur when GI bacteria spread from the anus to the urethra. Also, because the female urethra is close to the vagina, sexually transmitted infections, such as herpes, gonorrhea and chlamydia, can cause urethritis.

Symptoms:

Urinary tract infections don't always cause signs and symptoms, but when they do they may include:

  • A strong, persistent urge to urinate
  • A burning sensation when urinating
  • Passing frequent, small amounts of urine
  • Urine that appears cloudy
  • Urine that appears red, bright pink or cola-colored - a sign of blood in the urine
  • Strong-smelling urine
  • Pelvic pain, in women
  • Rectal pain, in men

Types of urinary tract infection
Each type of UTI may result in more-specific signs and symptoms, depending on which part of your urinary tract is infected.

Part of urinary tract affected

Signs and symptoms

Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)
Upper back and side (flank) pain
High fever
Shaking and chills
Nausea
Vomiting
Bladder (cystitis)
Pelvic pressure
Lower abdomen discomfort
Frequent, painful urination
Blood in urine
Urethra (urethritis)
Burning with urination

Risk Factors:

Any condition that triggers chronic inflammation in your nasal passages or sinuses, such as infections or allergies, may increase your risk of developing nasal polyps.
Conditions often associated with nasal polyps include:

  • Asthma, a disease that causes overall airway inflammation and constriction
  • An allergy-like response to aspirin or to pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve)
  • Allergic fungal sinusitis, an allergy to airborne fungi
  • Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder that results in the production and secretion of abnormally thick, sticky fluids, including thick mucus from nasal and sinus membranes
  • Churg-Strauss syndrome, a rare disease that causes the inflammation of blood vessels

Complications:

Complications of UTIs may include:

  • Recurrent infections, especially in women who experience three or more UTIs
  • Permanent kidney damage from an acute or chronic kidney infection (pyelonephritis) due to an untreated UTI, especially in young children
  • Increased risk of women delivering low birth weight or premature infants

Homeopathic treatment:
For acute UTI: Homeopathy is effective for acute UTI in most cases.

For recurrent UTI:
Homeopathy has significant role to place especially in the cases of recurring UTI. As said earlier, recurrence of UTI is a common challenge and the conventional antibiotics have little role to prevent the recurrence. Homeopathy proves very effective in controlling, reducing the frequent attacks of UTI.

 
 

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