Uterine Fibroid

Uterine fibroids are noncancerous growths of the uterus that often appear during childbearing years. Also called leiomyoma or myoma, uterine fibroids aren't associated with an increased risk of uterine cancer and almost never develop into cancer.
Uterine fibroids develop from the smooth muscular tissue of the uterus (myometrium). A single cell divides repeatedly, eventually creating a firm, rubbery mass distinct from nearby tissue. The growth patterns of uterine fibroids vary - they may grow slowly or rapidly, or they may remain the same size. Some fibroids go through growth spurts, and some may shrink on their own.

Causes:

The cause of uterine fibroids is not yet known, but research and clinical experience point to these factors:

  • Genetic changes. Many fibroids contain changes in genes that differ from those in normal uterine muscle cells. There's also some evidence that fibroids run in families and that identical twins are more likely to both have fibroids than non identical twins.
  • Hormones. Estrogen and progesterone, two hormones that stimulate development of the uterine lining during each menstrual cycle in preparation for pregnancy, appear to promote the growth of fibroids. Fibroids contain more estrogen and progesterone receptors than normal uterine muscle cells do. Fibroids tend to shrink after menopause due to a decrease in hormone production.
  • Other growth factors. Substances that help the body maintain tissues, such as insulin-like growth factor, may affect fibroid growth.

Symptoms:

In women who have symptoms, the most common symptoms of uterine fibroids include:

  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Prolonged menstrual periods - seven days or more of menstrual bleeding
  • Pelvic pressure or pain
  • Frequent urination
  • Difficulty emptying your bladder
  • Constipation
  • Backache or leg pains

Rarely, a fibroid can cause acute pain when it outgrows its blood supply. Deprived of nutrients, the fibroid begins to die. Byproducts from a degenerating fibroid can seep into surrounding tissue, causing pain and, rarely, fever. A fibroid that hangs by a stalk inside or outside the uterus (pedunculated fibroid) can trigger pain by twisting on its stalk and cutting off its blood supply.
Fibroid location, size and number influence signs and symptoms:

  • Submucosal fibroids. Fibroids that grow into the inner cavity of the uterus (submucosal fibroids) are more likely to cause prolonged, heavy menstrual bleeding and are sometimes a problem for women attempting pregnancy.
  • Subserosal fibroids. Fibroids that project to the outside of the uterus (subserosal fibroids) can sometimes press on your bladder, causing you to experience urinary symptoms. If fibroids bulge from the back of your uterus, they occasionally can press either on your rectum, causing a pressure sensation, or on your spinal nerves, causing backache.
  • Intramural fibroids. Some fibroids grow within the muscular uterine wall (intramural fibroids). If large enough, they can distort the shape of the uterus and cause prolonged, heavy periods, as well as pain and pressure.

Risk Factors:

There are few known risk factors for uterine fibroids, other than being a woman of reproductive age. Other factors that can have an impact on fibroid development include:

  • Heredity. If your mother or sister had fibroids, you're at increased risk of developing them.
  • Race. Black women are more likely to have fibroids than women of other racial groups. In addition, black women have fibroids at younger ages, and they're also likely to have more or larger fibroids.
  • Other factors. Onset of menstruation at an early age, having a diet higher in red meat and lower in green vegetables and fruit, and drinking alcohol, including beer, appear to increase your risk of developing fibroids.

Early and mild or moderate cases of Uterine fibroid often respond to homeopathy. Homeopathic remedies tend to balance the hormones, shrink the fibroids and reduce heavy menstrual bleeding. They are natural, effective, with no side effects and can be used even during pregnancy.

 
 

Upcoming Events

Date: 4th Feb, 2014:
World Cancer Day

Cancer is a leading cause of death around the world, according to WHO, which estimates that 84 million people will die of cancer between 2005 and 2015 without intervention. Read More

Date: 14th March, 2014:
World Kidney Day

World Kidney Day was first celebrated in 2006, and from that date on, the world still celebrates this world day with a different theme and certain massages every year. Read More